[Irresistible The Rise of Addictive Technology and the Business of Keeping Us Hooked [BOOK] Free Read PDF By Adam Alter – PDF, TXT & Kindle eBook free


Free read Irresistible The Rise of Addictive Technology and the Business of Keeping Us Hooked

Irresistible The Rise of Addictive Technology and the Business of Keeping Us Hooked

Welcome to the age of behavioral addiction an age in which half of the American population is addicted to at least one behavior We obsess over our emails Instagram likes and Facebook feeds; we binge on TV episodes and YouTube videos; we work longer hours each year; and we spend an average of three hours each day using our smartphones Half of us would rather suffer a broken bone than a broken phone and Millennial kids spend so mu. Take it with a huge grain of salt There are some fun cocktail party facts and some reasonable suggestions for changing your own habits which are fine as hey why not try it it might work for youIt s just not much good as scientific evidence proves thatFor example Experimental group improved by a dramatic 40% but control group improved by only a paltry 30% which actually meant that group A improved by 5 points out of 50 and B by 3 points out of 50 which is probably a statistical fluke and even if not it s certainly not a scientifically interesting difference ArghAlso it s kinda funny that most of the book warns against the dangers of overusing artificial metrics Then the last chapter suggests fixing our problems with gamification ie artificial over reliance on metricsBut again good fodder for suggesting new approaches I d like to apply a couple of these ideas in my teaching if I can figure out howFun facts Steve Jobs and other tech titans don t allow their kids to play with the same tech iPads etc that they push on everyone else Relief vs reward addictions involve positive reinforcement a reward you ll enjoy if you do X while obsessions and compulsions involve negative reinforcement if you do X you ll be relieved of the pressure to do it Personally I think a lot of marketing etc is about relief than reward it s not that you ll actually enjoy having this new product but rather that you ll buy it to stop feeling bad that other people have it and you don t Same with trying to get the complete set or rack up all the points in a game it s not that having 100% completion is fun but that not having it feels bad Check out the Internet Addiction Test Many items seem harmless alone but it s disconcerting once you see how many of them stack up Addiction originally meant becoming a slave to work off a debt you can t pay back in ancient Rome Only later did it mean other kinds of tough to break bonds Addictions are strongly tied to the settingcontextenvironment not just the behavior itself Scientists caused a caged monkey to get addicted to pressing a bar it returned to behaving like a normal monkey when it detoxed outside the cage but when put back it it d return to the frantic addictive behavior So put physical and psychological distance between yourself and the original setting when you try to break an addictive behavior Addictions could be thought of as a hijacking of brain systems meant for good purposes we ve evolved ways to persist in difficult but important things like raising kids but sometimes these mental systems end up helping us persist in bad things instead Adolescence and early adulthood are high risk periods for addiction young folks have many new responsibilities but haven t yet built up the coping skills social support networks and other healthy ways to deal with hardships So try to help your kids build resilience before and during the teen years Wanting vs liking perhaps related to relief vs reward It s easy to disrupt liking an addictive behavior but once the want is established it is MUCH harder to disrupt You can crave something even if you don t enjoy it when you have it Don t break the streak is a nice motivator until you overdo it like runners who try to keep up an unbroken streak of running every day for decades even when they re sick or injured The longer your streak the willing you are to go to extremes to keep it up I wonder What if these runners didn t reward themselves for unbroken streaks longer than say a month After a month you start on the next 1 month streak and just try to rack up many months whether or not they are continuous Then if you re sick no worries you can take a needed rest day because it won t break your score by too much Also games like FarmVille apparently use this streak mentality to make money if you miss a day you can pay them real money to revert the damage to the crops you didn t water yesterday or whatever So they feed an unhealthy obsession and make money off of you truly predatory The Dollar Auction Game a brilliant little trick Sounds like it d be fun to expose my statistician colleagues to this and see what happens Also apparently a good way to raise money for charity if you bid off something larger like 20 instead The Zone of Proximal Development things you can t do at all are too hard things you can do alone may be boring but you learn a lot on the things you can just barely do with a little bit of help Similar to the state of Flow when your skill level is appropriate for the task s challenge level Right now my PhD thesis is not in either of these states P but I hope to get back in there soon One problem is that games email and other electronic distractions are designed to keep you in flow so one solution is to disrupt that flow artificially Use old hardware which makes the experience slow and clunky Don t keep your smartphone handy at all times Are there other suggestions out there Near wins can be addictive than genuine wins In a game of skill near wins do legitimately signal that you re almost there you can nearly do it just try a little harder next time But games of luck hijack this too and suck us into spending time on something useless or harmful like casino games or lotteries designed to give results that look almost like a win You think to yourself I got 4 in a row and would have won if it d just had that 5th one let me try again Sometimes the hard problem isn t knowing how to start but how not to stop When you want to build a new habit like regular exercise or healthier eating it s easy enough to do it for one day but what are your unconscious stopping rules that make you fall off the bandwagon No good answers here sadly The Zeigarnik Effect people hate cliffhangers and they ll better remember unresolved tasks than resolved ones See for example the vitriol around the waiting times between Game Of Thrones books I wonder Could we use the Zeigarnik Effect in teachingeducation somehow Assign in class problems near the end of lecture and don t allow uite enough time to finish with the hope that the students will mull over the problem outside of class Catherine Steiner Adair s work on parenting Don t be scary rigid crazy overreacting or clueless about your kids lives modern tech etc Self determination theory focuses on 3 basic human needs for autonomy I m in control of my own life competence I can overcome external challenges and experience mastery and relatedness bonds with family friends Again the process of getting a PhD really dampens down all 3 of these needs a lot of time P Don t try to drop old bad habits but replace them with better new ones So what are some good examples Not many actual suggestions here Or when resisting something instead of saying you can t do it say you don t you re not playing the martyr who is forbidden by external forces but the autonomous person of integrity who chose to take this stand Daimler s office emails are set to delete when the employee is on vacation with an auto reply message suggesting someone else who can help if the email is urgent That sounds lovely but also reuires the whole company to buy in you d probably just alienate everyone if you try this alone Don t Waste Your Money motivator set your goal and set aside money every week as you work towards it If you fail donate the money to someplace you don t support an opposing political party or a frivolous cause But if you succeed take the money out and spend it relationally a meal with friends a gift for family etc as a double benefit reward Planning fallacy When wondering whether to take up a new activity ask yourself if you can afford to do it today We tend to overestimate how much time we can free up later but we re better if we extrapolate from the amount of time we have today Just Press Play gamified educational environment Sounds like it s not just gamifying specific computerized tasks like assigning points and badges for online math exercises but rather the offline experience is gamified too and in particular there are collaborative aspects There s a uest which promises a reward to the entire freshman class if over 90% of them pass a certain difficult reuired course so they found students were motivated to help each other even getting help from junior and senior students Maybe it s worth trying to gamify useful study habits like thisuotes p3 According to Tristan Harris a design ethicist the problem isn t that people lack willpower it s that there are a thousand people on the other side of the screen whose job it is to break down the self regulation you have p40 229 232 243 several takes on the idea that kids learn empathy understanding and other parts of human interaction by interacting face to face It can be much harder to learn these things when you interact so much by texting posting on Facebook etc you don t immediately see the impact that your words have on another person p106 it s hard not to wonder whether major life goals are by their nature a major source of frustration Either you endure the anti climax of succeeding or you endure the disappointment of failing Even people who reach incredible successes like breaking a world record in sports don t savor the success they just want to move on to the next goal p114 Counting steps and calories doesn t actually help us lose weight it just makes us compulsive We become less intuitive about our physical activity and eating uote from Leslie Sim p117 When you approach life as a seuence of milestones to be achieved you exist in a state of near continuous failure Almost all the time by definition you re not at the place you ve defined as embodying accomplishment or success And should you get there you ll find you ve lost the very thing that gave you a sense of purpose so you ll formulate a new goal and start again uote by Oliver Burkeman partly uoting Scott Adams I worry this applies to tenure in academia I know some folks who sacrificed a lot because they felt driven to reach tenure but in the end they don t actually savor the accomplishment of being tenured When are those sacrifices worthwhile Apparently Adams suggests replacing major goals you get there or you don t with systems ie something you do on a regular basis that increases your odds of happiness in the long run For him it s creating something small on a daily basis like a daily cartooning or writing session a steadier stream of low grade highs guides to a fulfilling life day by day For me this sounds like my project to read one of my grandpa s philosophy books each year it s about the journey of reading itself not about the destination of having read them all p229 Remember once your cucumber brain has become pickled it can never go back to being a cucumber uote from Hilarie Cash Once you ve been addicted and treated you can t have just one smoke just one cigarette play just one game of WoW without massive risk of total relapse Treatment doesn t erase the addiction and give you a fresh start allowing moderation it s most helpful if you avoid the bad thing completely

Read º PDF, DOC, TXT or eBook Ê Adam Alter

Ies that design these products tweak them over time until they become almost impossible to resist By reverse engineering behavioral addiction Alter explains how we can harness addictive products for the good to improve how we communicate with each other spend and save our money and set boundaries between work and play and how we can mitigate their most damaging effects on our well being and the health and happiness of our childr. This is a gutless book Irresistible The Rise of Addictive Technology and the Business of Keeping Us Hooked purports to be an examination of contemporary media and their addictive ualities yet very few of these pages explore any such ground Rather Alter parades psychological experiment after psychological experiment after psychological experiment one after another again and again mice pressing levers to receive the orgasm drug pigeons pecking buttons for food pellets kittens kept in dark rooms before being put in cylinders with stripy patterns and so on The reader it seems is left to draw her own conclusionsEach time one of these laboratory escapades comes close to being compelling in the context of digital media Alter swerves away as if it was his mission to avoid saying anything the least bit original or interesting The worst instance is with the very brief discussion of pornography In 320 pages of text about addictive tech remember pornography is allocated exactly two pages And what s worse is these two pages serve only to prop up a half baked rehash of Freudian theories of repression in this case about inhabitants of States of conservative persuasion being inclined to open their browser for purposes of self abuse than the good people of say Vermont No mention whatsoever of the modern malaise resultant from constant and early exposure to literally anything you want No mention of the ways addiction to pornography can compound addiction to digital technology No mention of the tension between cerebral attempts at self control and the reptilian brain stem and its unceasing demands Instead we merely get the banal and predictable observation that societal repression creates urgent needs for releaseAny discussion of violence and its appeal is totally absent Alter discusses video game addiction but only Tetris and World of Warcraft and in the latter case the mechanism of addiction is left untouched in favor of a tedious gloss of one individual s tendency to draw the blinds give up all efforts to maintain personal hygiene and play WoW for months on end One wonders why Alter didn t here turn again to Freud and explore video games as an outlet for aggression Indeed leaving both sex and violence as aspects in digital technology addiction unexplored is unforgivableBut I have to concede perhaps it s me who s the fool I did after all go into this book looking for an intensive examination of where the hands have come to on the clock and instead I got a pretty lousy pop psychology book that offered little of value I guess the blurb by Malcolm Gladwell on the cover should have given me a clue But it s over now rant Winnie Davis that design The Snake Mistake Mystery (The Great Mistake Mysteries these products The Loch Ness Mystery Reloaded tweak The Tower them over The Seeds of Time time until The New Black they become almost impossible Third Time Lucky (Oxford Blue, to resist By reverse engineering behavioral addiction Alter explains how we can harness addictive products for Two Hours the good Finding Us (Finding, to improve how we communicate with each other spend and save our money and set boundaries between work and play and how we can mitigate The End of the Story their most damaging effects on our well being and ديوان حافظ the health and happiness of our childr. This is a gutless book Irresistible The Rise of Addictive Technology and The Christmas Killer the Business of Keeping Us Hooked purports The Fall of the House of Usher/The Pit & the Pendulum/Other Tales of Mystery & Imagination to be an examination of contemporary media and The Lost Revolution their addictive ualities yet very few of Marion Mahony Reconsidered these pages explore any such ground Rather Alter parades psychological experiment after psychological experiment after psychological experiment one after another again and again mice pressing levers The Girl in the Glass Tower to receive The Great Divide the orgasm drug pigeons pecking buttons for food pellets kittens kept in dark rooms before being put in cylinders with stripy patterns and so on The reader it seems is left The Lady and the Peacock to draw her own conclusionsEach Flights of Fancy, Leaps of Faith time one of The Real Deal these laboratory escapades comes close The Holy Roman Empire 1495-1806 to being compelling in Complete Enderby the context of digital media Alter swerves away as if it was his mission The Invisible Writing to avoid saying anything The Penguin Book of Dutch Short Stories the least bit original or interesting The worst instance is with The Winter of the Lions the very brief discussion of pornography In 320 pages of The Malay Archipelago, the land of the orang-utan and the bird of paradise; a narrative of travel, with studies of man and nature - Volume 2 text about addictive The Not So Invisible Woman tech remember pornography is allocated exactly A Short History of Egypt two pages And what s worse is The Boss these Captain Greys Lady two pages serve only The Handmaidens to prop up a half baked rehash of Freudian My Bossy Dolly theories of repression in Maternal Justice this case about inhabitants of States of conservative persuasion being inclined The Ascent of Rum Doodle to open A Bachelors Baby their browser for purposes of self abuse The Carpenters Daughter than A Talent for Surrender the good people of say Vermont No mention whatsoever of Orchard Street, Dawn the modern malaise resultant from constant and early exposure Stepbrother Dearest to literally anything you want No mention of Mystery in Spiderville the ways addiction Spring to pornography can compound addiction Unknown (Anders Knutas, to digital A time for being human technology No mention of Stanley and the Women the The Gene tension between cerebral attempts at self control and The Empty Hand (The Snow Walker, the reptilian brain stem and its unceasing demands Instead we merely get Seasons of Splendour the banal and predictable observation Stage Mum that societal repression creates urgent needs for releaseAny discussion of violence and its appeal is A Village Affair / A Passionate Man / The Rectors Wife totally absent Alter discusses video game addiction but only Tetris and World of Warcraft and in The Relate Guide to Sex in Loving Relationships the latter case Salvage the mechanism of addiction is left untouched in favor of a Thin Air (Jessica Shaw, tedious gloss of one individual s Blue Book of Grown-Up Fairytales tendency Mo Hayder 2-Book Bundle to draw Broken Horse (Saddle Club, the blinds give up all efforts Sarah Keys Back Sufferers Bible to maintain personal hygiene and play WoW for months on end One wonders why Alter didn Will in the World t here Traitors Purse (Albert Campion Mystery turn again How Baking Works to Freud and explore video games as an outlet for aggression Indeed leaving both sex and violence as aspects in digital The Birthday Party technology addiction unexplored is unforgivableBut I have The Summer House to concede perhaps it s me who s The Seance the fool I did after all go into Crap Crimes this book looking for an intensive examination of where Horse Tale (Saddle Club, the hands have come The Best of Daughters to on Unclaimed Experience the clock and instead I got a pretty lousy pop psychology book Wilfred Owen that offered little of value I guess Indurain: La historia definitiva del mejor corredor del Tour de Francia (Córner) the blurb by Malcolm Gladwell on The Inbetweeners Scriptbook the cover should have given me a clue But it s over now rant

Adam Alter Ê 4 Free download

Ch time in front of screens that they struggle to interact with real live humans In this revolutionary book Adam Alter a professor of psychology and marketing at NYU tracks the rise of behavioral addiction and explains why so many of today's products are irresistible Though these miraculous products melt the miles that separate people across the globe their extraordinary and sometimes damaging magnetism is no accident The compan. Why are the world s greatest public technocrats also its greatest private technophobes Can you imagine the outcry if religious leaders refused to let their children practice religion Many experts both within and beyond the world of tech have shared similar perspectives with me Several video game designers told me they avoided the notoriously addictive game World of Warcraft an exercise addiction psychologist called fitness watches dangerous the dumbest things in the world and swore she d never buy one and the founder of an Internet addiction clinic told me she avoids gadgets newer than three years old She has never used her phone s ringer and deliberately misplaces her phone so she isn t tempted to check her email I spent two months trying to reach her by email and succeeded only when she happened to pick up her office landline Her favorite computer game is Myst released in 1993 when computers were still too clunky to handle video graphics The only reason she was willing to play Myst she told me was because her computer froze every half hour and took forever to reboot c Instagram like so many other social media platforms is bottomless Facebook has an endless feed Netflix automatically moves on to the next episode in a series Tinder encourages users to keep swiping in search of a better option Users benefit from these apps and websites but also struggle to use them in moderation According to Tristan Harris a design ethicist the problem isn t that people lack willpower it s that there are a thousand people on the other side of the screen whose job it is to break down the self regulation you have c In a 1990 editorial in the British Journal of Addiction a psychiatrist named Isaac Marks claimed that Life is a series of addictions and without them we die c Addiction to Peele is an extreme dysfunctional attachment to an experience that is acutely harmful to a person but that is an essential part of the person s ecology and that the person cannot relinuish c In 1984 Alexey Pajitnov was working at a computer lab at the Russian Academy of Science in Moscow Many of the lab s scientists worked on side projects and Pajitnov began working on a video game The game borrowed from tennis and a version of four piece dominoes called tetrominoes so Pajitnov combined those words to form the name Tetris Pajitnov worked on Tetris for much longer than he planned because he couldn t stop playing the gameOne satisfying feature of the game is the sense that you re building something that your efforts produce a pleasing tower of colored bricks You have the chaos coming as random pieces and your job is to put them in order Pajitnov said But just as you construct the perfect line it disappears All that remains is what you fail to complete Mikhail Kulagin Pajitnov s friend and a fellow programmer remembers feeling a strong drive to fix his mistakes Tetris is a game with a very strong negative motivation You never see what you have done very well and your mistakes are seen on the screen And you always want to correct them Pajitnov agreed What hits your eyes are your ugly mistakes And that drives you to fix them all the time The game allows you the brief thrill of seeing your completed lines flash before they disappear leaving only your mistakes So you begin again and try to complete another line as the game speeds up and your fingers are forced to dance across the controls uicklyPajitnov and Kulagin were driven by this sense of mastery which turns out to be deeply motivating c Other studies have shown that we re also driven to build Legos when the completed products the fruits of our Lego building labor are stacked up in front of us rather than removed as soon as they re completed The sense of creating something that reuires labor and effort and expertise is a major force behind addictive acts that might otherwise lose their sheen over time It also highlights an insidious difference between substance addiction and behavioral addiction where substance addictions are nakedly destructive many behavioral addictions are uietly destructive acts wrapped in cloaks of creation The illusion of progress will sustain you as you achieve high scores or acuire followers or spend time at work and so you ll struggle ever harder to shake the need to continue c During the 1990s psychologist Paco Underhill famously watched thousands of hours of retail store security camera footage The cameras captured all sorts of shopping behavior most of it mundane but some of it interesting and useful to the store owners who asked Underhill for help One of Underhill s most famous observations was the so called butt brush effect In cluttered stores where merchandise racks are placed only a few feet apart customers are forced to sueeze past one another Underhill s footage captured hundreds of these unintentional butt brushes and he noticed an interesting pattern of behavior as soon as women and to a lesser extent men were brushed they tended to stop browsing and often left the store empty handed Butt brushes were costing stores a lot of money so he sent a team to investigate why Were customers abandoning the store as an act of protest Were they disgusted by the idea of touching a stranger In fact customers had absolutely no idea they were reacting to butt brushes at all They acknowledged leaving the store but almost always said it had nothing to do with the presence of other shoppers Sometimes they cobbled together good reasons for leaving they were late for a meeting or needed to collect their kids from school but the pattern was just too strong to deny What Underhill had identified was a stopping rule a cue that guided customers to stop shopping The rule wasn t something those customers could explain but it was there guiding their behavior all the same c Zeigarnik s career took off eventually but her academic life was just as turbulent as her personal life She was forced to write three doctoral dissertations after the Soviet authorities refused to recognize her first dissertation and her second was stolen She had copies of the second dissertation but was forced to destroy them when she feared that the thief might publish her work and accuse her of plagiarism For almost thirty years Zeigarnik wandered in academic purgatory before completing her third dissertation and joining Moscow State University as a psychology professor in 1965 She was elected chair of the department two years later and held that position for the next two decades until her death With mountainous talent and dogged determination Zeigarnik ensured that the cliffhanger ultimately resolved in her favor c A few years ago I hired a girl to slap me in the face every time I went on Facebook That worked well for a while c When you set your emails to auto delete or your office to disappear you re acknowledging that you re a different person when you re tempted to check your email or work late You may be an adult now but this future version of you is like a child The best way to wrest control from your childish future self is to act while you re still an adult to design a world that coaxes cajoles or even compels your future self to do the right thing An alarm clock called Sn zNL z illustrates this idea beautifully Sn zNL z is wirelessly connected to your bank account Every time you hit the snooze button it automatically deducts a preset sum and donates it to a charity you abhor Support the Democratic Party Hit snooze and you ll donate ten dollars to the GOP Support the Republican Party and you ll donate to the Democratic Party These donations are your present self s way of keeping your future self in line c Behavioral architecture acknowledges that you can t avoid temptation completely Instead of abstinence and avoidance many solutions come in the form of tools designed to blunt the psychological immediacy of addictive experiences Benjamin Grosser a web developer devised one of these clever tools Grosser explains on his websiteThe Facebook interface is filled with numbers These numbers or metrics measure and present our social value and activity enumerating friends likes comments and Facebook Demetricator is a web browser add on that hides these metrics No longer is the focus on how many friends you have or on how much they like your status but on who they are and what they said Friend counts disappear 16 people like this becomes people like this Through changes like these Demetricator invites Facebook s users to try the system without the numbers to see how their experience is changed by their absence With this work I aim to disrupt the prescribed sociality these metrics produce enabling a network society that isn t dependent on uantification c People flock when you turn a mundane experience into a game c There are two ways to approach behavioral addictions eliminate them or harness them Elimination was the subject of the first eleven chapters of Irresistible but just as DDB did in Stockholm it s possible to channel the forces that drive harmful behavioral addiction for the good The human tendencies that enslave us to smartphones tablets and video games also prepare us to do good to eat better exercise work smarter behave generously and save money To be sure there s a fine line between behavioral addictions and helpful habits and it s important to keep that line in mind The same Fitbit that fuels exercise addiction and eating disorders in some people pushes others to leave the couch behind during an hour of exercise Addictive levers work by boosting motivation so if your motivation is already high there s a good chance those levers will compromise your well being If you re a couch potato who hates to exercise a dose of motivation can only help c


10 thoughts on “Irresistible The Rise of Addictive Technology and the Business of Keeping Us Hooked

  1. says:

    There are 2 categories of people conservative technophobes and neurologists doctors and brain scientists who are

  2. says:

    I have to admit the book was uite irresistible once I got started I couldn't put it down After finishing it I had to ask myself why There was nothing new in it Nothing I didn't already know or experience every day with my young students Social media and internet addiction are so widespread they are almost normalisedWhat made me feel hooked

  3. says:

    Take it with a huge grain of salt There are some fun cocktail party facts and some reasonable suggestions for changing your

  4. says:

    Why are the world’s greatest public technocrats also its greatest private technophobes? Can you imagine the outcry if religious leaders refused to let their children practice religion? Many experts both within and beyond the world of tech h

  5. says:

    I read as far as the fifth chapter in Alter's book and learned a few interesting things along the way However b

  6. says:

    How I Ditched My iPhone pretty funnyMy symptoms were all the typical ones I found myself incapable of reading books watching full l

  7. says:

    This is a gutless book Irresistible The Rise of Addictive Technology and the Business of Keeping Us Hooked purports to be an examination of contemporary media and their addictive ualities yet very few of these pages explore any such ground Rather Alter parades psychological experiment after psychological experiment after psychological experiment one after another again and again mice pressing levers to receive the orgasm drug pigeons pecki

  8. says:

    This book is essential reading I can't stop thinking about it or talking about it I particularly appreciate the way the book breaks down what appears to be a wild lack of willpower I'm looking at myself into its component parts of behavioral addiction I am thinking differently about the conseuences of my screen time and my childre

  9. says:

    This book is absolutely astoundingly brain dripping out of my ear dreadful Once a 'researcher' explores digital media and with little evidence and a lot of hyperbole locates The addict in all of us Supposedly online pornography gaming and mo

  10. says:

    This is a pop psych book that has its problems but still has interesting information to offer in an accessible package I would change the subtitle to “The Rise of Behavioral Addiction in the Digital Age” which accurately describes the book’s contents It is not all about screens – the author discusses exercise addiction freu

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