[PDF] Silent Spring ☆ Rachel Carson

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Silent Spring came as a cry in the wilderness a deeply felt thoroughly researched and brilliantly written argument that changed the course of history Without this book the environmental movement might have been long delayed or never have developed at all from the Introduction by Vice President Al GoreRarely does a single book alter the course of history but Rachel Car. A must read book for the concerned Carson brings forth without ever putting on alarmist garbs all the horrors of the warfare that we have undertaken against ourselves The book is of course outdated and most of the bigger concerns have been if not addressed at least taken seriously But the true value of the book is in understanding how long a time frame has to elapse before such matters of truly catastrophic nature follows the process of scientific suspicion investigation verification then the slow seepage into public consciousness then the denialism and finally the first baby steps of public policy Reading the book so many years after its intended audience we have to go beyond the book and apply the concern to the current issues that we face It is not the facts or the issues that is important it is the attitude that Carson endorsesWith the potent weapons in our hands can we still afford to be so lax in our reaction to life threatening dangers sneering in our face Will nature be so forgiving next time around As crude a weapon as the cave man s club the incomplete human knowledge has been hurled against the fabric of life without any consideration of the risks which is beyond our current understanding or technology to calculate Listening Woman by Tony Hillerman Summary & Study Guide undertaken against ourselves The book is of course outdated and most of the bigger concerns have been if not addressed at least taken seriously But the true value of the book is in The White Nights of Ramadan understanding how long a time frame has to elapse before such matters of truly catastrophic nature follows the process of scientific suspicion investigation verification then the slow seepage into public consciousness then the denialism and finally the first baby steps of public policy Reading the book so many years after its intended audience we have to go beyond the book and apply the concern to the current issues that we face It is not the facts or the issues that is important it is the attitude that Carson endorsesWith the potent weapons in our hands can we still afford to be so lax in our reaction to life threatening dangers sneering in our face Will nature be so forgiving next time around As crude a weapon as the cave man s club the incomplete human knowledge has been hurled against the fabric of life without any consideration of the risks which is beyond our current Beyond the Pale understanding or technology to calculate

SUMMARY Silent Spring

Silent Spring

It is without uestion one of the landmark books of the twentieth century Silent Spring served as a touchstone for Al Gore while he was waorking on his widely praised bestselling book on the environment Earth in the Balance Now Rachel Carson's message is important than ever and no one is ualified than Al Gore to introduce her classic book to a new generation of reader. 5 Reposted in honour of her 111th birthdayDavid Attenborough said that after Charles Darwin s The Origin of Species Silent Spring was probably the book that changed the scientific world the mostWhy Because marine biologist Rachel Carson explains in no uncertain terms exactly how mankind was changing the natural world for the worse in unimagined ways through pesticide use Agriculture wasn t concerned with wildlife or waterways just livestock and cropsI remember as a child hearing that DDT was so safe you could sprinkle it on your cornflakes A couple of decades later we were told pretty much the same thing about Roundup a herbicide not a pesticide which has also fallen into serious disrepute recentlyI understand it was the editors who recommended that Carson add an opening chapter She wrote A Fable for Tomorrow and what a chapter it is There was once a town in the heart of America where all life seemed to live in harmony with its surroundings The town lay in the midst of a checkerboard of prosperous farms with fields of grain and hillsides of orchards where in spring white clouds of bloom drifted above the green fields Even in winter the roadsides were places of beauty where countless birds came to feed on the berries and on the seed heads of the dried weeds rising above the snow Then it all changed Mysteriously things began sickening streams plants animals people The songbirds are gone the fish are gone A grim spectre has crept upon us almost unnoticed and this imagined tragedy may easily become a stark reality we all shall know She does say that this is just a representation of any of a number of towns in the world and she knows of no single town that s lost everything Well back in 1962 anyway What has already silenced the voices of spring in countless towns in America This book is an attempt to explain With that simple chapter we get it The enormity of what s at stakeThus began today s environmental movement There have always been conservationists and environmentalists but this book gave them a voice and opened the eyes of the rest of usAnd explain she does clearly factually fascinatingly and she includes the anecdotal stories we still seem to need to grab our attention Much of what she describes is now part of the regular school curriculum and there are lots of mainstream articles about soil health microbes worms and the interrelationship between even the smallest parts of natureSome of her examples have a horrible fascination where they describe the unintended conseuences of wiping out one pest intentionally which either kills other things or facilitates the spread of another worse pest In Clear Lake California they were spraying annoying gnats with DDD a close relative of DDT but supposedly less harmful to fish By the third season they sprayed they were losing birds and discovered the build up in fatty tissues How WhyWell grebes eat fish which eat other fish which eat plankton and this stuff keeps building upOne a brown bullhead had the astounding concentration of 2500 parts per million It was a house that jack built seuence in which the large carnivores had eaten the smaller carnivores that had eaten the herbivores that had eaten the plankton that had absorbed the poison from the waterThe last chapter The Other Road refers to the famous Robert Frost poem The Road Not Taken Carson explains that our two roads are not eual The way we re going is fast and easy but leads to disaster The other fork of the road the one less travelled by offers our last our only chance to reach a destination that assures the preservation of our earth The choice after all is ours to make She holds out hope for biological solutions and says in 1962 many specialists are working on this in their respective fields biology entomology biochemistry genetics too many to enumerateShe uotes professor Carl P Swanson a Johns Hopkins biologist Any science may be likened to a river It has its obscure and unpretentious beginning its uiet stretches as well as its rapids its periods of drought as well as of fullness It gathers momentum with the work of many investigators and as it is fed by other streams of thought it is deepened and broadened by the concepts and generalizations that are gradually evolved Why haven t we learned yet It s hard to believe that we have celebrated the 50th anniversary of this book without demanding our governments respect independent scientific reports and give corporate lobbyists the short shrift they deserve What will be left of the world on its 100th anniversary I wonderThis is an everybody should read this book Infamous uestion one of the landmark books of the twentieth century Silent Spring served as a touchstone for Al Gore while he was waorking on his widely praised bestselling book on the environment Earth in the Balance Now Rachel Carson's message is important than ever and no one is Comfort of a Man ualified than Al Gore to introduce her classic book to a new generation of reader. 5 Reposted in honour of her 111th birthdayDavid Attenborough said that after Charles Darwin s The Origin of Species Silent Spring was probably the book that changed the scientific world the mostWhy Because marine biologist Rachel Carson explains in no A Cowboy Christmas uncertain terms exactly how mankind was changing the natural world for the worse in Comfort of a Man unimagined ways through pesticide Husband From 9 To 5 use Agriculture wasn t concerned with wildlife or waterways just livestock and cropsI remember as a child hearing that DDT was so safe you could sprinkle it on your cornflakes A couple of decades later we were told pretty much the same thing about Roundup a herbicide not a pesticide which has also fallen into serious disrepute recentlyI The Bonny Bride understand it was the editors who recommended that Carson add an opening chapter She wrote A Fable for Tomorrow and what a chapter it is There was once a town in the heart of America where all life seemed to live in harmony with its surroundings The town lay in the midst of a checkerboard of prosperous farms with fields of grain and hillsides of orchards where in spring white clouds of bloom drifted above the green fields Even in winter the roadsides were places of beauty where countless birds came to feed on the berries and on the seed heads of the dried weeds rising above the snow Then it all changed Mysteriously things began sickening streams plants animals people The songbirds are gone the fish are gone A grim spectre has crept The Beleaguered Lord Bourne (Regency Trilogy, upon Bending the Rules (Sisterhood Diaries, us almost Hope Street unnoticed and this imagined tragedy may easily become a stark reality we all shall know She does say that this is just a representation of any of a number of towns in the world and she knows of no single town that s lost everything Well back in 1962 anyway What has already silenced the voices of spring in countless towns in America This book is an attempt to explain With that simple chapter we get it The enormity of what s at stakeThus began today s environmental movement There have always been conservationists and environmentalists but this book gave them a voice and opened the eyes of the rest of Burkes Christmas Surprise usAnd explain she does clearly factually fascinatingly and she includes the anecdotal stories we still seem to need to grab our attention Much of what she describes is now part of the regular school curriculum and there are lots of mainstream articles about soil health microbes worms and the interrelationship between even the smallest parts of natureSome of her examples have a horrible fascination where they describe the A Perfect Blood (The Hollows, unintended conseuences of wiping out one pest intentionally which either kills other things or facilitates the spread of another worse pest In Clear Lake California they were spraying annoying gnats with DDD a close relative of DDT but supposedly less harmful to fish By the third season they sprayed they were losing birds and discovered the build Just Wars and Moral Victories up in fatty tissues How WhyWell grebes eat fish which eat other fish which eat plankton and this stuff keeps building Two Paradigms for Divine Healing upOne a brown bullhead had the astounding concentration of 2500 parts per million It was a house that jack built seuence in which the large carnivores had eaten the smaller carnivores that had eaten the herbivores that had eaten the plankton that had absorbed the poison from the waterThe last chapter The Other Road refers to the famous Robert Frost poem The Road Not Taken Carson explains that our two roads are not eual The way we re going is fast and easy but leads to disaster The other fork of the road the one less travelled by offers our last our only chance to reach a destination that assures the preservation of our earth The choice after all is ours to make She holds out hope for biological solutions and says in 1962 many specialists are working on this in their respective fields biology entomology biochemistry genetics too many to enumerateShe Kenget e Milosaos uotes professor Carl P Swanson a Johns Hopkins biologist Any science may be likened to a river It has its obscure and Early Chinese Religion, Part Two (220-589 Ad) unpretentious beginning its At Europes Borders uiet stretches as well as its rapids its periods of drought as well as of fullness It gathers momentum with the work of many investigators and as it is fed by other streams of thought it is deepened and broadened by the concepts and generalizations that are gradually evolved Why haven t we learned yet It s hard to believe that we have celebrated the 50th anniversary of this book without demanding our governments respect independent scientific reports and give corporate lobbyists the short shrift they deserve What will be left of the world on its 100th anniversary I wonderThis is an everybody should read this book

READ & DOWNLOAD ✓ PDF, DOC, TXT or eBook á Rachel Carson

Son's Silent Spring did exactly that The outcry that followed its publication in 1962 forced the banning of DDT and spurred revolutionary changes in the laws affecting our air land and water Carson's passionate concern for the future of our planet reverberated powerfully throughout the world and her elouent book was instrumental in launching the environmental movement. I picked this up because it s a a classic of American nature and environmental writing and ostensibly marks the beginning of American environmental activism in the modern sense ie we deserve not to be poisoned than leisure grounds for posterity I found the rhetorical style interesting She breaks the book up into chapters on where toxins come from how they accumulate and spread and what effects they have on wildlife food and human health In each she offloads tale after tale of dead birds poisoned farm workers and nearly inhuman acts of government negligence and the corporations that facilitate them I found this droning repetition of evidence boring a dull and depressing tirade but I suppose that kind of argumentative overload has power if not appealI felt some of her language and opinions were surprisingly dated She often referred to insects using words like horde and militaristic symbols of weaponry and defense Here s an example from p 246 the broader problem is the fact that our chemical attack is weakening the defenses inherent in the environment itself defenses designed to keep the various species in check Each time we breach these defenses a horde of insects pours through There are a couple odd implications here like nature being a designed clockwork system of checks and balances and insects as a kind of evil constantly trying to overthrow it Of course further down the page she writes The balance of nature is not a status uo it is fluid ever shifting in a constant state of adjustment The two statements seem at odds and the bulk of the book effuses the latter sentiment but I found it strange that she would occasionally be so careless with her language I pick nits of course but perhaps it demonstrates that this book lies at a transition between American attitudes toward natureI was also intrigued by her almost unconditional support of biological control techniues over pesticides generally the use of cultivated predators to control a pest population readily advocating the importation of effective predators with I think no examples of the kinds of ecological disaster that can ensue when such tactics are pursued without very careful consideration cane toads anyone Again perhaps a sign of the timesAll in all certainly worth my time I d like to read some analysis on the book and on Carson herself the preface to this editions is great and I m very keen to read her natural history writing esp on marine life


10 thoughts on “Silent Spring

  1. says:

    A must read book for the concerned Carson brings forth without ever putting on alarmist garbs all the horrors of

  2. says:

    This is a classic It has not lost its validity It has an important global message still today 54 years after publication Everyone should read this at least once This reads as a horror story but it is true The scientific studies are numerous clear and to the point The demise of habitats and living creatures are lyrically depicted The author

  3. says:

    Happy Earth Day 2020 though it feels like a dirge than a waltz we are dancing today as Trump takes the occasion of a global pandemic to relax all environmental poison controls while we are supposedly listening daily to his self promoting campaign speeches To allow mercury to be dumped into for instance my Great Lakes is bo

  4. says:

    How could I forget the first book I read about pesticides and how they are destroying our planet? Rachel Carson is literally my hero After reading Carson's book I decided this is what I wanted to do with my life I spent many years in the field of environmental geology and I have her to thank I believe this book is as relevant today as it was when she wrote it in 1962 She has an ease of writing that not only expresses her deep concerns fo

  5. says:

    We stand now where two roads diverge But unlike the roads in Robert Frost's poem they are not eually fair The road we are travelling is deceptively easy a smooth superhighway on which we progress with great speed but at its end lies disaster The other fork of the road the one 'less travelled by' offers our last our only c

  6. says:

    I picked this up because it's a a classic of American nature and environmental writing and ostensibly marks the beginning of American environmental activism in the modern sense ie we deserve not to be poisoned than leisure grounds for posterit

  7. says:

    5★ Reposted in honour of her 111th birthdayDavid Attenborough said that after Charles Darwin's The Origin of Species Silent Spring w

  8. says:

    2 starsDNF 35%Welcome to uickie Review with Valliya a new series of reviews that I am starting if I don't feel like writing a review but still have some thoughts so I talk about them in a uick and concise manner DI can see why Rachel Carson's novel Silent Spring was so influential it is easy to read and to understand The opening 'story' about

  9. says:

    This is nonfiction concerning the harmful effects that chemicals which were created to make life easier for man pesticides weed killers etc have on the environment This was first published in 1962 and the author is credited for opening the door on his topic However even now 55 years later it is still considered a hot topic Great strides have

  10. says:

    Advocacy is tricky When you’re trying to motivate people to take action you need to decide whether to appeal to the head t

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