Elie Wiesel [epub / PDF] Un di Velt Hot Geshvign

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S memories of the death of his family the death of his own innocence and his despair as a deeply observant Jew confronting the absolute evil of man This new translation by his wife and most freuent translator Marion Wiesel cor Upon completion of this book my mind is as numb as if I had experienced this suffering myself So much pain and suffering are thrown at you from the pages that one cannot comprehend it all in the right perspective One can only move forward as the victims in this book did Step by step page by page Initially numbness is the only way to deal with such anguish Otherwise one becomes uickly overwhelmed by the images that evoke uestions that cannot be answered And yet I read this book from the comfort of a warm home and a full stomach Imagine the impact if it were otherwise Imagine being forced from your home to live in barracks living off soup and bread forced to go outside in the winter without a jacket and perform manual labor from dawn to dusk with the smell of a crematorium in your backyardHow many of us could endure this for just one day let alone for years What would this do to us physically and important what would this do to us mentally Yet we witness in this book the miracle of the prisoner s survival The strength and raw endurance of the human spirit We must be reminded of this this glorious strength but also reminded that it was the weakness of the human spirit that inflicted these crimes on others Humanity has the capability of extreme strength but also of extreme weakness which often hides under the guise of self righteousness and need for power over others This book is necessary in order to remind us of this These things must not be forgotten Read this book even if you think you have read enough of the Holocaust and of pain and suffering Every book that I have read about the Holocaust offers something new including this one Read it as a memorial and a tribute Read it as a reminder of how fortunate we are to have a free society and how we must preserve this freedom at all costs There are those who would like to take it away Fascism is alive and well I started reading Holocaust novels after reading Edelweiss Pirates Operation Einstein Edelweiss Pirates 1 bookcoverEdelweiss Pirates 1 Operation Einstein they are must reads in this genre are of course Number the Stars Number the stars I enjoyed that authors other works That novel was The Book that turned me onto YA WW2 novels They allow us to reflect on our own lives learn history and become better people in general

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Un di Velt Hot Geshvign

Rects important details and presents the most accurate rendering in English of Elie Wiesel's testimony to what happened in the camps and of his unforgettable message that this horror must simply never be allowed to happen agai 5 starsI am at a loss for wordsupon finishing this memoir I am so full of intense emotion yet I feel empty at the same timeThis is a DEEPLY moving and powerful book about the author s experience in concentration camps and the atrocities that happened during the Holocaust Words cannot describe how I truly feel about what I read on these pages It is impossible for us as readers to truly fathom this piece of history unless we lived it I hope everyone takes the time to read this 120 page memoir at some point in their lives The author was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1986 calling him a messenger to mankind for his written works We simply cannot risk forgetting

Elie Wiesel à 9 Summary

Born in the town of Sighet Transylvania Elie Wiesel was a teenager when he and his family were taken from their home in 1944 to Auschwitz concentration camp and then to Buchenwald Night is the terrifying record of Elie Wiesel' The author who is actually in the above picture said it best in the forward Only those who experienced Auschwitz know what it was I think we can all agree with that But can we the reader even understand what happened there Can modern men and women comprehend that cursed universe I m not entirely sureI first read this in my eighth grade History class I was 13 It changed my life Before this book my world was sunshine and rainbows My biggest concern was whether or not a boy named Jason liked me back I got mad at my mom when she made me go to bed on time I complained if I didn t like what we were having for dinner and I argued about what I was and wasn t allowed to watch on TV I thought I knew about WWII Both of my grandfathers served in it and so my parents wanted to make sure that we understood the sacrifices they made the things they saw I watched documentaries about it with my father the history nerd listened to the few stories that my grandfathers would tell but up until that point I had been intentionally sheltered from the horrors of the holocaust I had only been told in the vaguest terms what had happened that so many millions of people had been killed that Hitler and his men had sought to exterminate the Jewish people My parents wanted to spare me from what exactly that meant until they thought I was mature enough to be able to absorb it But then I read this And for the first time in my life I was completely self aware I felt like a child like a complete and utter fool For what were my problems compared to those of this narrator How hard was my life compared to what he endured What millions of people similarly endured I now understood my own insignificance in the grand scheme of things and suddenly the reality of the world was a crushing weight It wasn t all sunshine and rainbows It was dark It was ugly and unforgiveable I remember getting really angry when I finished this Mostly I was angry at the world and at humanity as a whole but I unfairly turned some of that on my father After all he hadn t prepared me for what I found in this book At one point I even demanded that he explain this thing to me He couldn t Fifteen years later my second read of this book has impacted me just as much as the first There s this uestion I kept asking myself while reading That uestion was How I m sure that Why might seem the obvious choice here but I couldn t let myself wander down the rabbit warren that is that uestion Madness lies at the end of it So I m left with How How did this happen How did so many average human beings contribute to this How did the SS working in the camps reach the point that they were physically and mentally able to toss live infants into flames How were the German girls that lived within smelling distance of Auschwitz able to pass love notes to the soldiers that marched their skeletal prisoners past How did these same starving prisoners manage to run 20 kilometers in the freezing snow How could the SS officers that shot them if they stopped on the first day of their death march then shout encouragements to them the next How could the German citizens near the train tracks throw bread into the prisoners cattle cars just to watch them murder each other for it How could human beings do these things to each other How HOW HOW Like my father I have no answersAnd that I believe is why many modern humans will never really be able to comprehend the things that happen in this book Absorb it yes Bear witness to it yes Understand it Hopefully never I finished this at lunch today And now I m sitting in my cubicle glancing at my neighbors and wondering if they re capable of this kind of depravity Am I What would I do to survive Would I beat my own father to death for the bread in his hand I hope to God that none of us will ever have to find out the answers to these uestions If you read a single book in your life this should be itBlog Facebook Twitter Instagram Pinterest


10 thoughts on “Un di Velt Hot Geshvign

  1. says:

    The author who is actually in the above picture said it best in the forward; “Only those who experienced Auschwitz know what it was” I think we can all agree with that But can we the reader even understand what happened there Can modern men and women comprehend that cursed universe I’m not entirely sureI first read this in my eighth grade History class I was 13 It changed my life Before this book my world was su

  2. says:

    There is little that freaks me out than the Holocaust And I'm not belittling it at all with the phrase 'freaks me out' Growing up in the 1970

  3. says:

    Our lives no longer belong to us alone; they belong to all those who need us desperately Elie Wiesel

  4. says:

    Upon completion of this book my mind is as numb as if I had experienced this suffering myself So much pain and suffering are thrown at you from the pages that one cannot comprehend it all in the right perspective One can onl

  5. says:

    This book is a hard righteous slap in the conscience to everyone of good will in the world and should stand as a stark reminder of both 1 the almost unimaginable brutality that we as a species are capable of; and 2 that when it comes to preve

  6. says:

    The first time I read Night by Eli Wiesel I was in an eighth grade religious school class At that time it had recently become a law in my state to teach the Holocaust as part of the general curriculum and as a result my classmates and

  7. says:

    I was the accuser God the accused My eyes had opened and I was alone terribly alone in a world without God without man Without love or mercyThese words and this book just tore at my heart I have seen Night have heard of Night for many years now I waited to read it unsure what I could possibly gain from reading another account of the evil existing among our fellow human beings – I will become enraged and depressed I

  8. says:

    This book has garnered so many five star reviews and deals with such important subject matter that it almost feels like an

  9. says:

    5 starsI am at a loss for wordsupon finishing this memoir I am so full of intense emotion yet I feel empty at the same timeThis is a DEEPLY moving and powerful book about the author's experience in concentration camps and the atrocities that happened during the Holocaust Words cannot describe how I truly feel about what I read on these pages It is impossible for us as readers to truly fathom this piece of history unless we lived

  10. says:

    Terrifying I have read two books that described a nightmare painted a picture of hell The second was Blood Meridian or the Evening Redness in the West by Cormac McCarthy and first is Night I still think of this book sometimes and shudder and I realize that evil is never too far buried in us The scene where the line of doomed prisoners splits in two with Mengela conducting a perverse parody of the last judgment