(Pdf Kindle ePUB) The Filter Bubble What the Internet is Hiding From You BY Eli Pariser


Summary The Filter Bubble What the Internet is Hiding From You

The Filter Bubble What the Internet is Hiding From You

An eye opening account of how the hidden rise of personalization on the Internet is controlling and limiting the information we consumeIn December 2009 Google began customizing its search results for each user Instead of giving you the most broadly popular result Google now tries to predict what you are most likely to click on According to MoveOnorg board president Eli Pariser Google's change in policy is symptomatic of the most significant shift to take place on the Web in recent years the rise of personalization In this groundbreaking investigation of the new hidden Web Pariser uncovers how this growing trend threatens to control how we consume and share information as a society and reveals what we can do about itThough the phenomenon has gone largel. Well if you want to be terrified about how the web is scooping information about us stereotyping us pigeonholing us basically doing the opposite of what we thought the web was GOING to do for society then read this book At the very least it helps become informed about exactly what we do when we surf the web Nothing is safe online Everything you do online is defining you in ways you never thought you d be defined Everything you do is hackable The future is even worse in those respects Lots of fun paranoia inspiring information for the tech savvy

Free read ☆ E-book, or Kindle E-pub ´ Eli Pariser

Nd fed only news that is pleasant familiar and confirms our beliefs and because these filters are invisible we won't know what is being hidden from us Our past interests will determine what we are exposed to in the future leaving less room for the unexpected encounters that spark creativity innovation and the democratic exchange of ideasWhile we all worry that the Internet is eroding privacy or shrinking our attention spans Pariser uncovers a pernicious and far reaching trend on the Internet and shows how we can and must change course With vivid detail and remarkable scope The Filter Bubble reveals how personalization undermines the Internet's original purpose as an open platform for the spread of ideas and could leave us all in an isolated echoing wor. The Mosaic Browser unleashed the internet boom of the 1990s The National Center for Supercomputing Applications NCSA at the University of Illinois in Urbana Champaign developed it in late 1992 NCSA released the browser in 1993 It was a Killer App which brought the Graphical User Interface in our uest to search and navigate the exploding wealth of distributed information that was on offer Edward Snowden says that the Internet was mostly made of by and for the people till about 1998 Its purpose was to enlighten and not to monetize It was administered by a provisional cluster of perpetually shifting collective norms Snowden believes that this was the most pleasant and successful anarchy he had ever experienced Fast forward twenty five years we have this book by Eli Pariser It tells us that there are algorithms at work which sabotage our access to the open and free Internet of the 1990s What we get now is what the algorithms think we want to get How did we get to this bizarre world in just two decades Is it true that this is what has become of the Internet or is it another false futuristic projectionBefore answering the above uestions let us look into what Pariser says about the Filter Bubble The Internet explosion of the 1990s ushered in a new era of open access to information as it was direct from the producer to the consumer Independent online magazines and websites flourished and it looked as though we could break out of a filtered universe managed by the media companies Alas Pariser says that on the contrary it is getting a lot worse than before Inscrutable algorithms have replaced the human sentinels of the past with even control They scrutinize what kind of searches we make and what search results we click on They know what websites we visit and what we buy online They listen in on what we say on various issues in our emails and blogs what news stories we read and what books we buy Based on this and many other of our online actions they generate a composite profile of who we are and then use it to filter our online experience As a conseuence when we search on Google for Climate Change Issues we get a different set of results from our contrarian friend The filters operate on a three step process First the algorithms figure out who we are and what we like Then they provide us with content and services that they think best fit us Finally with and online activity they refine it to get the fit just right The end product is that your identity shapes your media Is this a problem Pariser says that this is dangerous for our democracy The reason is that democracy reuires citizens to see things from than one point of view Instead these filters enclose us in our bubbles and offer us parallel but separate universes Personalization filters influence us with ideas which we already hold They amplify our desire for things that are familiar and leave us oblivious to the contrarian world beyondThe author also offers a solution He says that the Internet must provide us with what we want to see and even with what we need to see We should get a plethora of information that includes ideas that challenge our notions and make us uncomfortable This reuires the filtering algorithms embed in themselves a broader sense of social responsibility That is the only way to do justice to the original goal of the Internet flooding us with new ideas new contacts and contrarian outlooksWhen I finished reading the book I found that I am not at all in agreement with either the author s thesis or his solutions I have been an active user of the Internet for the past twenty five years Contrary to the author s belief my experience is that we now hear diverse voices than ever before Independent studies also show that most people do not live in echo chambers and filter bubbles created by Facebook or Twitter I shall try to put forward the reasons for my conclusions belowThis book suggests as if we had a filter free world before and that the Internet giants have taken it away The truth is that we never had a golden age of a Filter free information world Before the Internet of the 1990s in democratic societies information was disseminated to the public mainly through newspapers radio TV and other magazines However the owners of these media and their journalists controlled and edited what we saw and read Hence we always got only a filtered view of the world depending on which parts of the media we favored For example if one was a liberal one chose to read one or of the NY Times Washington Post The Guardian The New Yorker the Le Monde Weekly and so on In visual media the choice would have been CNN MSNBC or BBC for newsSimilarly people on the conservative side chose their options in the media Our social circles consisted mostly of family friends colleagues at work and neighbors who probably served partially as echo chambers A majority of us lived in bubbles like this created by ourselves These were perhaps the reasons why it was easy for the government and the media to convince us that Saddam Hussein had WMDs Weapons inspectors like Hans Blix and Scott Ritter had repeatedly stated in public that they had disarmed Saddam already But they did not get through the filters Going back to the 1950s we had the media creating echo chambers to enable Senator McCarthy to create the paranoia of a communist under every bed In the next decade it was the panic that the Soviet Union had opened up a dangerous lead over the United States in the deployment of intercontinental ballistic missiles In the 1980s it was the Japanese who were supposed to take over our electronics and chip industry To get exposed to diametrically opposite and different ideas one had to read various newspapers or magazines or books All the contrarian views cost money to access and so most people ended up just spending on media that reflected the world view they already had Contrary to the author s thesis there is evidence to support the view that people find themselves less and less in a filter bubble since the new internet era began in the 1990s Three independent studies according to the BBC have been conducted since 2013 to evaluate the claims of echo chambers and filter bubbles Seth Flaxman and colleagues at Oxford University examined the browsing histories of 50000 users based in the US in 2013 They found that social media and search users who landed on Breitbart and Fox News were also likely to visit sites expressing opposing viewpoints Their media diet was varied overall Flaxman says that social media by its nature exposes you to several other sources increasing diversitySimilarly a Pew survey around the 2016 US Presidential Election broadly agreed with Flaxman s findings with the majority of people reporting a range of opinions in their social media feeds And the University of Ottawa s Dubois came to similar conclusions with her studies as well In an ironic twist a team led by Christopher Bail at Duke University measured a group of than 1600 Twitter users political positions and came to some startling results They found evidence that well meaning attempts to counter the echo chamber and filter bubble could lead to political polarizationMoreover it is not as though we are in a vice like grip of the Filter Bubble As a political liberal I can access the conservative and right wing perspectives easily and without cost by visiting websites that promote them I can also check the veracity of their claims immediately by going to a fact checking website For example Duke University NC maintains a database of fact checking organizations It tracks than 100 non partisan organizations around the world The criteria for inclusion in the database is also specified so that we can make our own decision on trusting the websitesAs for getting diversified views on a given uestion today s Internet offers multiple numbers of ways When we read a news story we can also read the Readers comments column Often this section exposes us to critical views and comments from people of different backgrounds outside our social circle It is especially so in news sites like NYTimes WP and The Guardian Such a possibility did not exist in the pre internet era In the past the readers responses were posted only a day or two later when the story was already cold Even then we got to read only a few of them Nowadays we get exposed to hundreds of opinions on each news story Secondly Google itself has course corrected now after criticisms of the filter bubble A year ago to give readers a full range of perspectives Google News app included a top stories option in addition to the personalized news Articles included here were selected according to how trusted their source is rather than the user s preferences Thirdly Twitter is unfiltered We can follow people on Twitter who are active in areas of our interest but have a different opinion from us Similarly on Facebook we can keep friends whose contributions we do not like but which represent a good counterpoint with the function show first prominently in the newsfeed Fourthly we could use DuckDuckGo to search instead of Google DuckDuckGo does not track us However in my experience search results from Google are superior to the ones from DuckDuckGoFifthly we can stop using Sign in with FacebookGoogleTwitter while logging on to other sites to prevent profilingIn conclusion I think the fears of filter bubbles and echo chambers are overblown Media has always shaped our identity In the past once we chose the media to tune into its editorial board decided on the filter Now based on our online behavior an algorithm selects the filter In my view this is a better situation for us We have control over how the algorithm profiles us If it correctly profiles me as a liberal then I can watch a few NPR videos on Steve Bannon and his interviews to broaden my profile I could search for papers on Climate change skepticism and read them I could regularly read the London Times Such online actions would diversify my profile I can even throw a wrench in the works by googling something nutty to mess up the personalization algorithm and thereby randomize my profile The simple fact is that those who always strove for diversity in their world view would always seek it and find it whether filter bubbles exist or notOn the other hand those who preferred to live in filter bubbles and echo chambers will continue to do so even if the Internet offered diversity It is not the job of the filtering algorithms to shoulder a broader sense of social responsibility The original goal of the Internet is to flood us with new ideas new contacts and contrarian outlooks It is still so and it is our responsibility to tap it Positively No Dancing pleasant familiar and confirms our beliefs and because these filters are invisible we won't know what is being hidden from us Our Nailed It! past interests will determine what we are exposed to in the future leaving less room for the unexpected encounters that spark creativity innovation and the democratic exchange of ideasWhile we all worry that the Internet is eroding House of Vinegar: The Power of Sour, with Recipes privacy or shrinking our attention spans Pariser uncovers a Aliens vs. Predator (Aliens Vs. Predator, pernicious and far reaching trend on the Internet and shows how we can and must change course With vivid detail and remarkable scope The Filter Bubble reveals how Masks personalization undermines the Internet's original We purpose as an open The Flight of the Century platform for the spread of ideas and could leave us all in an isolated echoing wor. The Mosaic Browser unleashed the internet boom of the 1990s The National Center for Supercomputing Applications NCSA at the University of Illinois in Urbana Champaign developed it in late 1992 NCSA released the browser in 1993 It was a Killer App which brought the Graphical User Interface in our uest to search and navigate the exploding wealth of distributed information that was on offer Edward Snowden says that the Internet was mostly made of by and for the Waking Up people till about 1998 Its Dead Man Walking purpose was to enlighten and not to monetize It was administered by a Shoot for the Moon provisional cluster of On the Bus (Sibling Lust, perpetually shifting collective norms Snowden believes that this was the most A Cord of Three Strands pleasant and successful anarchy he had ever experienced Fast forward twenty five years we have this book by Eli Pariser It tells us that there are algorithms at work which sabotage our access to the open and free Internet of the 1990s What we get now is what the algorithms think we want to get How did we get to this bizarre world in just two decades Is it true that this is what has become of the Internet or is it another false futuristic Introduction to Digital Literacy projectionBefore answering the above uestions let us look into what Pariser says about the Filter Bubble The Internet explosion of the 1990s ushered in a new era of open access to information as it was direct from the Memes producer to the consumer Independent online magazines and websites flourished and it looked as though we could break out of a filtered universe managed by the media companies Alas Pariser says that on the contrary it is getting a lot worse than before Inscrutable algorithms have replaced the human sentinels of the Sport Skill Instruction for Coaches past with even control They scrutinize what kind of searches we make and what search results we click on They know what websites we visit and what we buy online They listen in on what we say on various issues in our emails and blogs what news stories we read and what books we buy Based on this and many other of our online actions they generate a composite Days Like This profile of who we are and then use it to filter our online experience As a conseuence when we search on Google for Climate Change Issues we get a different set of results from our contrarian friend The filters operate on a three step キングダム 3 [Kingdom 3] process First the algorithms figure out who we are and what we like Then they Formosa Betrayed provide us with content and services that they think best fit us Finally with and online activity they refine it to get the fit just right The end Her Mothers Daughter product is that your identity shapes your media Is this a God, Creation, and Tools for Life (Journey of the Soul, problem Pariser says that this is dangerous for our democracy The reason is that democracy reuires citizens to see things from than one تحشیه بر دیوار خانگی - شعر بلند point of view Instead these filters enclose us in our bubbles and offer us Twin Passions parallel but separate universes Personalization filters influence us with ideas which we already hold They amplify our desire for things that are familiar and leave us oblivious to the contrarian world beyondThe author also offers a solution He says that the Internet must Blood Brothers provide us with what we want to see and even with what we need to see We should get a Is America Falling Off the Flat Earth? plethora of information that includes ideas that challenge our notions and make us uncomfortable This reuires the filtering algorithms embed in themselves a broader sense of social responsibility That is the only way to do justice to the original goal of the Internet flooding us with new ideas new contacts and contrarian outlooksWhen I finished reading the book I found that I am not at all in agreement with either the author s thesis or his solutions I have been an active user of the Internet for the Saints Who Raised the Dead past twenty five years Contrary to the author s belief my experience is that we now hear diverse voices than ever before Independent studies also show that most Her Unexpected Love people do not live in echo chambers and filter bubbles created by Facebook or Twitter I shall try to The Guys put forward the reasons for my conclusions belowThis book suggests as if we had a filter free world before and that the Internet giants have taken it away The truth is that we never had a golden age of a Filter free information world Before the Internet of the 1990s in democratic societies information was disseminated to the J.Lo public mainly through newspapers radio TV and other magazines However the owners of these media and their journalists controlled and edited what we saw and read Hence we always got only a filtered view of the world depending on which In the Australian Billionaires Arms parts of the media we favored For example if one was a liberal one chose to read one or of the NY Times Washington Post The Guardian The New Yorker the Le Monde Weekly and so on In visual media the choice would have been CNN MSNBC or BBC for newsSimilarly Go-Go Sadisto (Agent 0008, people on the conservative side chose their options in the media Our social circles consisted mostly of family friends colleagues at work and neighbors who Hockey Hall of Fame MVP Trophies & Winners probably served Cooking For American Homemakers partially as echo chambers A majority of us lived in bubbles like this created by ourselves These were Super Powereds perhaps the reasons why it was easy for the government and the media to convince us that Saddam Hussein had WMDs Weapons inspectors like Hans Blix and Scott Ritter had repeatedly stated in Now Be Fearless (2016, public that they had disarmed Saddam already But they did not get through the filters Going back to the 1950s we had the media creating echo chambers to enable Senator McCarthy to create the The Riggle Twins paranoia of a communist under every bed In the next decade it was the Spice I Am panic that the Soviet Union had opened up a dangerous lead over the United States in the deployment of intercontinental ballistic missiles In the 1980s it was the Japanese who were supposed to take over our electronics and chip industry To get exposed to diametrically opposite and different ideas one had to read various newspapers or magazines or books All the contrarian views cost money to access and so most The Last Mission Volume 1 people ended up just spending on media that reflected the world view they already had Contrary to the author s thesis there is evidence to support the view that Perfect Inventions=Perfect World people find themselves less and less in a filter bubble since the new internet era began in the 1990s Three independent studies according to the BBC have been conducted since 2013 to evaluate the claims of echo chambers and filter bubbles Seth Flaxman and colleagues at Oxford University examined the browsing histories of 50000 users based in the US in 2013 They found that social media and search users who landed on Breitbart and Fox News were also likely to visit sites expressing opposing viewpoints Their media diet was varied overall Flaxman says that social media by its nature exposes you to several other sources increasing diversitySimilarly a Pew survey around the 2016 US Presidential Election broadly agreed with Flaxman s findings with the majority of Learning to Be Happy people reporting a range of opinions in their social media feeds And the University of Ottawa s Dubois came to similar conclusions with her studies as well In an ironic twist a team led by Christopher Bail at Duke University measured a group of than 1600 Twitter users アカメが斬る!零 10 [Akame ga Kiru! Zero 10] (Akame ga Kill! Zero, political Out of Reach But in Sight positions and came to some startling results They found evidence that well meaning attempts to counter the echo chamber and filter bubble could lead to Self Treatments Including the Radiant I Am political The Babysitter is a Good Girl for Daddy polarizationMoreover it is not as though we are in a vice like grip of the Filter Bubble As a Tomarts price guide to character & promotional glasses political liberal I can access the conservative and right wing My Son, The Double Agent perspectives easily and without cost by visiting websites that The Early Cases of Akechi Kogoro promote them I can also check the veracity of their claims immediately by going to a fact checking website For example Duke University NC maintains a database of fact checking organizations It tracks than 100 non The Final Compliance of Sixty-Three Fourteen partisan organizations around the world The criteria for inclusion in the database is also specified so that we can make our own decision on trusting the websitesAs for getting diversified views on a given uestion today s Internet offers multiple numbers of ways When we read a news story we can also read the Readers comments column Often this section exposes us to critical views and comments from aidan brophilius people of different backgrounds outside our social circle It is especially so in news sites like NYTimes WP and The Guardian Such a The Treasures of Biel-Tanigh possibility did not exist in the Texas Childrens Hospital Pediatric Nutrition Reference Guide 10th Edition pre internet era In the Twin Dragons' Destiny: The Dragon Lords of Valdier Series, Book 11 posted only a day or two later when the story was already cold Even then we got to read only a few of them Nowadays we get exposed to hundreds of opinions on each news story Secondly Google itself has course corrected now after criticisms of the filter bubble A year ago to give readers a full range of The Trouble with Men perspectives Google News app included a top stories option in addition to the ¿Quién me ha robado el mes de abril? personalized news Articles included here were selected according to how trusted their source is rather than the user s A Political Chronology of the Americas preferences Thirdly Twitter is unfiltered We can follow Double Coverage (Love and Sports, people on Twitter who are active in areas of our interest but have a different opinion from us Similarly on Facebook we can keep friends whose contributions we do not like but which represent a good counterpoint with the function show first Evening Crowd at Kirmsers prominently in the newsfeed Fourthly we could use DuckDuckGo to search instead of Google DuckDuckGo does not track us However in my experience search results from Google are superior to the ones from DuckDuckGoFifthly we can stop using Sign in with FacebookGoogleTwitter while logging on to other sites to White Dragon Two prevent Otherlife Dreams (Otherlife, 1) profilingIn conclusion I think the fears of filter bubbles and echo chambers are overblown Media has always shaped our identity In the Küsse im Schnee (Die drei !!!, past once we chose the media to tune into its editorial board decided on the filter Now based on our online behavior an algorithm selects the filter In my view this is a better situation for us We have control over how the algorithm A Collection of Uzbek Short Stories profiles us If it correctly The Uninvited profiles me as a liberal then I can watch a few NPR videos on Steve Bannon and his interviews to broaden my The City of Folding Faces profile I could search for Southern Folk, Plain & Fancy papers on Climate change skepticism and read them I could regularly read the London Times Such online actions would diversify my Colorado Wilderness 2018 12 x 12 Inch Monthly Square Wall Calendar, USA United States of America Rocky Mountain State Nature profile I can even throw a wrench in the works by googling something nutty to mess up the Billy the Friendly Blue Bird personalization algorithm and thereby randomize my The Inner Temple of Witchcraft: Magick, Meditation and Psychic Development preferred to live in filter bubbles and echo chambers will continue to do so even if the Internet offered diversity It is not the job of the filtering algorithms to shoulder a broader sense of social responsibility The original goal of the Internet is to flood us with new ideas new contacts and contrarian outlooks It is still so and it is our responsibility to tap it

Eli Pariser ´ 9 review

Y undetected until now personalized filters are sweeping the Web creating individual universes of information for each of us Facebook the primary news source for an increasing number of Americans prioritizes the links it believes will appeal to you so that if you are a liberal you can expect to see only progressive links Even an old media bastion like The Washington Post devotes the top of its home page to a news feed with the links your Facebook friends are sharing Behind the scenes a burgeoning industry of data companies is tracking your personal information to sell to advertisers from your political leanings to the color you painted your living room to the hiking boots you just browsed on ZapposIn a personalized world we will increasingly be typed a. Very interesting book Here are the notes I wrote in the margins while reading it on the Kindle Page 15Note This is why I love going to libraries The chance encounter of a new topic you never thought of exploring 256 Page 17Note I need to go to town hall meetings 279 Page 20Notes on this intro I don t mind companies targeting me as I live my life much with a transparent attitude However the author makes very good point that we each end up in or own bubble Now all this info gathering is what I totally want our strategy to be at work we need to know our customer I blows my mind that ppl don t see that at work or don t care 316 Page 29uote When you log in after a day reading Kindle e books at the beach is able to subtly customize its site to appeal to what you ve read Note Ha I m reading this on a kindle app now Hi 423 Page 49uote Now all that was changing One executive in the marketing session was especially blunt The publishers are losing he said and they will lose because they just don t get it Note So true This carries over to the syndication world as well Ppl don t get that you have to make your content reach a demographic Your content can t just be general generalness any like how newspapers behave 661 Page 83uote Stumbling on Happiness author Dan Gilbert presents volumes of data to demonstrate that we re terrible at figuring out what makes us happyNote But God knows 1080 Page 85uote ensure that we aren t constantly seeing the world anewNote I wonder if I have poor schema cuz I often see the world anew Or perhaps my schemata is flexible Or maybe I have a bunch able to be referenced like a library Hmmm I think it s the flexible one I don t have a deep library brain My brain is not strong in brute force but nimble and flexible 1099 Page 85uote Schemata can actually get in the way of our ability to directly observe what s happeningNote What we called in art critiues baggage the viewer brings 1105 Page 91uote contents But to feel curiosity we have to be conscious that something s being hiddenNote Kinda like how I m going to start hanging the what is your treasure tag outside the treasure chests 1175 Page 91uote Stripped of the surprise of unexpected events and associations a perfectly filtered world would provoke less learning And there s another mental balance that personalization can upset the balance between open mindedness and focus that makes us creativeNote Yes The flexible mind for creativity It makes me thankful that right after college I made it a goal to live a creative life and to show others how to live creatively I researched and devoured books on creativity It makes me glad that I did that at a young age it set me up to be where I m now and where I m going 1185 Page 92uote Stripped of the surprise of unexpected events and associations a perfectly filtered world would provoke less learning And there s another mental balance that personalization can upset the balance between open mindedness and focus that makes us creativeNote Whoa Adderall cuts down creativity AWAY ADDERALL AWAY 1191 Page 93uote Farah the director of the University of Pennsylvania s Center for Cognitive Neuroscience has bigger worries I m a little concerned that we could be raising a generation of very focused accountants Note Lol our poor accountants 1202 Page 93uote definition ingenuity comes from the juxtaposition of ideas that are far apart and relevance comes from finding ideas that are similarNote Long live wikipedia and its abilities to make us curious about random topics 1206 Page 93uote By definition ingenuity comes from the juxtaposition of ideas that are far apart and relevance comes from finding ideas that are similar Note Hmmm interesting point I agree on that definition of ingenuitycreativity but couldn t creativity also be bringing together relevant things Or am I watering down what creativity is 1210 Page 99uote One could tie a string to the barometer lower it and measure the string thinking of the instrument as a thing with weight The unamused instructorNote Ha 1286 Page 100uote Avoid smartass physicists But the episode also explains why Bohr was such a brilliant innovator His ability to see objects and concepts in many different ways made it easier for him to use them to solve problemsNote It s too bad there are so many narrow minded But that doesn t bother me much I can stil do my creative thing 1293 Page 100uote The kind of categorical openness that supports creativity also correlates with certain kinds of luck While science has yet to find that there are people whom the universe favors ask people to guess a random number and we re all about eually bad at it there are some traits that people who consider themselves to be lucky share They re open to new experiences and new people They re also distractableNote Lol I m distractible I wonder how many of the hundred of people here so intently focused on the music are distractable 1296 Page 102uote Creative environments often rely on liuid networks where different ideas can collide in different configurationsNote This is SO why I want flexible workspaces at work 1315 Page 121uote an awful day in the near future Pandora might know to preload Pretty Hate Machine for you when you arriveNote If I m in a bad mood I want to hear something positive I don t want to continue in my rut That s like being stuck in a pit and not coming out there s a Scripture reference about the pit in Psalms 1552 Page 121uote it can also be used to take advantage of your psychologyNote It goes to show that you choose your mood Circumstances can be hard but ultimately you choose how to handle it Lke in James are you a ship that is tossed to and fro by every prevailing wind Your attitude is determined by choices made over a period of time 1552 Page 122uote spring for the slicer dicer that they d never purchase in the light of dayNote I see what he s saying but 3am is the least likely time I would buy I want to do research first I don t fear this at all Bu it does suck for those who are prone 1558 Page 122uote it s not such a stretch to imagine political campaigns targeting voters at times Note Notice the proliferation of political tv shows on Sunday mornings the time when we spend worshipping what is most important to us 1565 Page 123 124uote your phone should figure out what you would like to be searching for before you do In the fast approachingNote Ha Right my mind is way too all over the place when I m walking around public BUT I wouldn t mind hearing interesting trivia about certain places It would also be neat to have a record of al the places I ve placed public art for people to see even after it s gone 1579 Page 124uote Westen a neuropsychologist whose focus is on political persuasion demonstrates the strength of this priming effect by asking a group of people to memorize a list of words that include moon and ocean A few minutes later he changes topics and asks the group which detergent they prefer Though he hasn t mentioned the word the group s show of hands indicates a strong preference for TideNote Is that because Tide has a logo shaped like the moon or because it s the moontide moving thing Maybe I use Tide because I tend to do my laundry at night rolls eyes 1590 Page 126uote Though there are people whose posts you re far interested in it s her posts that you seeNote I totally want to be able to control this That s why I set up lists but it doesn t show all that I want 1606


10 thoughts on “The Filter Bubble What the Internet is Hiding From You

  1. says:

    I read this book because it’s very well known because he gave a famous talk about this at a recent TED confere

  2. says:

    Well if you want to be terrified about how the web is scooping information about us stereotyping us pigeonholing us basically doing

  3. says:

    355; 4 stars; BThe first half of this book is a solid 5 star read and I'd recommend it to anyone who wants to learn about social engineering and the Internet and some of the ways we are heavily manipulated through our searches likes clicks The author got a bit carried away and dragged the story out taking away some of the impact so that is why I didn't give it a 5 star all the way through I think an importan

  4. says:

    The big message in this book is that curators' of information on the Internet like Google and Facebook use of personalization has significant negative conseuences If I search for something on Google I am going to get results tailored to where I am and who Google thinks I am Pariser argues that we are less and less confronted with ideas we don't agree with or new and surprising ideasThe biggest issue is not even that the personalization is

  5. says:

    Very interesting book Here are the notes I wrote in the margins while reading it on the Kindle Page 15Note This is why I love going to libraries The chance encounter of a new topic you never thought of exploring 256 Page 17Note I need to go

  6. says:

    It's ironic how I became aware of this book and read it given the topic of filtering and personalization I found this book serendipitously I was in the public library waiting for a workstation to open up I was standing at

  7. says:

    NOTE A month after writing my original review I changed my rating from 4 to 5 because of how it has stayed with me and the

  8. says:

    A very important book for anyone who uses the internet The big providers Facebook and Google especially filter the content they present to you without telling you and without your permission Even if you think you've elected to receive everything They do it in the name of personalization but it's largely to services advertisers and it affects your online experience in insidious ways This book is short well written and easy to und

  9. says:

    The Mosaic Browser unleashed the internet boom of the 1990s The National Center for Supercomputing Applications NCSA at the University of Illinois in Urbana–Champaign developed it in late 1992 NCSA released the browser in 1993 It was a 'Killer App' which brought the Graphical User Interface in our uest to search and navigate the exploding wealth of distributed information that was on offer Edward Snowden says that th

  10. says:

    Eli Pariser argues in The Filter Bubble that rise of pervasive embedded filtering is changing the way we experience the internet and ultimately the world Now that companies can aggregate our web behaviors likes and purchases online profiles of web users can be built that can be profitably sold to interested parties This book therefore covers two issues total personalization of delivered web data and nature of these created web personas Rega

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *