(Pdf ebook) White Gold by Giles Milton – Epub and TXT

review White Gold

Imony of a Cornish cabin boy named Thomas Pellow Giles Milton vividly reconstructs a disturbing little known chapter of history Pellow was bought by the tyrannical sultan of Morocco who was constructing an imperial pleasure palace of enormous scale and grandeur built entirely by Christian slave labour As his personal. This book typically of its author was thoroughly engrossing and a remarkable historical tale I found it fascinating that Thomas Pellow could survive in spite of the adversity of spending 23 years as a slave in Meknes Morocco He was captured and taken into slavery aged 11 and yet outlived those who were captured along with him even though he was so young The cruel and barbarous treatment of white slaves during this period piued my interest which remained high throughout the duration of the book Pellow has a style which allows the reader to feel connected personally with the key characters in spite of them living several centuries previously This grips the reader and takes him along on a whirlwind adventure which could easily be taken from a high budget Hollywood filmOverall a great book and definitely worth reading for anyone but particularly those with an interest in history andor adventureI didn t find the book uite as interesting however as Samurai William hence me giving it only 3 stars

summary ☆ E-book, or Kindle E-pub ´ Giles Milton

White Gold

This is the forgotten story of the million white Europeans snatched from their homes and taken in chains to the great slave markets of North Africa to be sold to the highest bidder Ignored by their own governments and forced to endure the harshest of conditions very few lived to tell the tale Using the firsthand test. A riveting multi sourced account of a majorly overlooked era of European history the reasons for which you may make of as you will Also the author provides a fab bibliography of further reading of accounts of the Barbary or White Slave Trade as told by those who were captured and lived or the opinions of their contemporaries and a fantastic introduction to the extraordinary life of Thomas PellowIt was Pellow s sharp and smart nature that led him to follow his uncle on his ship which made slaves of the whole crew but it was also the same strength of character that allowed him to defy all odds his uncle died and most of the crew and become something of a valued slave to Moulay Ismail ruler of Morocco in Meknes and beyond Even his forced apostasy from Christianity to Islam didn t dampen his hopes of returning to England one day even though apostasy was highly frowned upon back then but not might I add to the death He was ordered to marry and his wife bore him a daughter Still he never gave up hope of escape It was practically a miracle that his final journey across mountains swarming with bandits who almost killed him was a success and he made it to the British military camp on Gibraltar It s sad to note on Pellow s return to the little town of Penryn in Cornwall where neither he nor his parents recognised each other which is legit enough he felt rather isolated and alien with Morocco feeling like homeTo be honest I m surprised it s so short considering the amount of information that seems to be left over from the era but then again Pellow s own account is still available as are others including a descendent of his family Captain Edward Pellew who gave Algiers a whupping around 100 years after Thomas Pellow was captured by the Moors causing significant enough damage to the slave city that it led not long after to the complete annihilation of the White Slave Trade by the FrenchMilton s research took him to the very heart of the trade the market in Algiers which is still extant though with I presume zero human cargo today He unveils information about part of Europe s past that is shamefully brushed under the carpet primarily I would take a gander because of the modern European obsession with guilt Interestingly enough the 300 odd years of the White Slave Trade overlapped with the Black Slave Trade and so it isn t particularly surprising in the era of apology that millions of Europeans died at the hands of Muslims and their black slaves and we hardly know the damnedest about it Slavery is slavery and it really doesn t matter where it s coming from only that it s ended which Europe did for both trades conseuently

Giles Milton ´ 9 free read

Slave he would witness first hand the barbaric splendour of the imperial court as well as experience the daily terror of a cruel regime Gripping immaculately researched and brilliantly realised WHITE GOLD reveals an explosive chapter of popular history told with all the pace and verve of one of our finest historians. A fascinating account of one white slave in particular and the white slave trade in general Here s an excellent portrayal of the Barbary Corsairs and their trade in white slaves during the course of the mid 17th century until the destruction of Algiers in the early 19th centuryHighly recommended my favourite Milton to date


10 thoughts on “White Gold

  1. says:

    Initially I was under the impression that this book is a historical novel so I wasted first 20 pages waiting for the novel to start Once I realised it was actually historical non fiction I started really enjoying

  2. says:

    My thoughts in two words utterly brilliant This should be reuired reading in schools along with learning about the Black Slave Trade I thought this was very well written exceptionally well researched and an engaging read That being said the high amount of descriptions of torture genital mutilation beatings and murder made me a sea

  3. says:

    A riveting multi sourced account of a majorly overlooked era of European history the reasons for which you may make of as you will Also the author provides a fab bibliography of further reading of accounts of the Barbary or White Slave Trade as told by those who were captured and lived or the opinions of their contemporaries and a fantastic introduction to the extraordinary life of Thomas PellowIt was Pellow's sharp and smart n

  4. says:

    Until reading Giles Milton's book I hadn't realised the extent of White Slave Trade in 18th century Europe and AmericaMoroccan pirates or Corairs were regularly both captury vessels at sea and selling their crews and passengers into slavery or carrying out raids on England's South West coast and kidnapping men women and children

  5. says:

    This book typically of its author was thoroughly engrossing and a remarkable historical tale I found it fascinating that Thomas Pellow could survive in spite of the adversity of spending 23 years as a slave in Meknes Morocco He was captured and taken into slavery aged 11 and yet outlived those who were captured along with him even though he was so young The cruel and barbarous treatment of white slaves during this period piued

  6. says:

    Giles Milton is one of my favourite authors bringing history to life with some remarkable personal tales of the people and places involved in some of the most significant yet nevertheless obscure historical events of the last few centuriesThis book is no exception He brings the story of the million European slaves taken by the Barbary corsairs between the 16th and beginning of the 19th centuries via Thomas Pellow a young cabin

  7. says:

    I read this book at a time when I had no plans of travelling to Morocco Having just done so it was an odd combination of events and research needs that made it happen I cannot recommend this book too highlyI'm glad to say that conditions have i

  8. says:

    When I got the book from my parents I was astonished at first Of course I knew about black slaves and the triangular trade but I'd never heard of it before that there were so many white slavesThe author manages to make his story very lively and to tell the incredible events in great detail yet excitingI do not

  9. says:

    A fascinating account of one white slave in particular and the white slave trade in general Here's an excellent portrayal of the Barbary Corsairs and their trade in white slaves during the course of the mid 17th century until the destruction of Algiers in the early 19th centuryHighly recommended my favourite Milton to date

  10. says:

    So as I'm reading the first part of this book about how the Brits and other Europeans were snatched — sometimes right from their homes — and then transported in unthinkably awful conditions to slave pens almost as bad

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